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By Admin on Thursday, April 23, 2015 2:40 PM

RALEIGH -- The State Library of North Carolina and State Archives are celebrating the ways they help preserve information whether created physically or digitally. It's part of National Preservation Week, April 26 - May 2, which highlights the role libraries, archives and other cultural institutions play in preserving our information. A week of activities await you.

A social media campaign, daily preservation trivia question, exhibits and other activities are available. Discover activities from the State Archives at here and from the State Library here. The State Archives and State Library are located at 109 E. Jones St. They will offer Preservation Week programs on site.

By Admin on Friday, April 17, 2015 10:47 AM

Events Include Exclusive Photo Opportunities and Throttle Time in the Class J No. 611

SPENCER -- The North Carolina Transportation Museum will hold two events to celebrate the restoration of Norfolk & Western Class J steam locomotive No. 611, one for the general public and one for serious railroad photographers.

The famous streamlined passenger locomotive, built in 1950, has been at the museum for overhaul for almost a year and will soon be completed. It returns to its home at the Virginia Museum of Transportation on May 30.

On May 23, the museum will host the "611 Send Off" party with cake and a chance to see inside the locomotive cab and watch it move on and off the turntable. A very limited number of lucky people will be able to purchase 30 minutes of throttle time on the locomotive at a cost of $611 per slot on a first-come, first-served basis. Only 10 spots will be available for throttle time, starting at 8 a.m. and going to 11 a.m. The engine will be available for viewing from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and will be displayed on the turntable on the hour. Throttle time will resume at 4 p.m. and conclude at 6 p.m. 

By Admin on Thursday, April 16, 2015 5:53 PM

DURHAM -- A humble looking wooden desk with worn yellowed sheets could tell quite a tale of the Civil War. It is the field desk of Capt. Orange Sackett, 136th N.Y. Regiment and is one of the premiere artifacts now displayed in the museum gallery at Bennett Place State Historic Site. The redesigned museum gallery opens free to the public April 18 at 10 a.m.

This weekend starts the formal observance of the surrender negotiations at Bennett Place State Historic Site, where the American Civil War ended. Here was the largest troop surrender of the war. More than Appomattox, Va., Citronelle, Ala., or New Orleans, La. With the surrender of Con. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston to Union Maj. Gen. William Sherman, the few remaining Confederate forces abandoned ideas of continuing guerilla warfare and soon surrendered also.

The Sackett military field desk is about a yard square and has a flat bottom that folds up in suitcase style and could travel to the camps and battlefields with the captain. Capt. Sackett managed daily duties with this desk. He fought in major battles including Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. At Gettysburg he encountered many North Carolina soldiers. Here 6,000 sons of North Carolina died, the largest total of any Confederate state, and one quarter of all deaths of that battle.

The Battle of Bentonville was the last of the battles for Capt. Sackett and the 136th N.Y. He had been on the march through Atlanta and Savannah before that. Indeed, his field desk could tell quite a story of war, death and destruction.

By Admin on Thursday, April 16, 2015 4:49 PM

Monthly series begins Saturday, April 18 

NEW BERN -- Families are invited to chart a course for the North Carolina History Center for immersive new children’s programs scheduled for the second Saturday of every month beginning in April.

Tryon’s Tots and Tryon’s explorers programs will be held alternating months and include trips to such sites on the Tryon Palace grounds as the 18th-century Blacksmith Shop, the Costume Shop, Kitchen Garden and historic Stanly House. Each program will focus on history relating to each location, including 18th-century trades, clothing, gardening and the nautical history of New Bern. During each program, tots and explorers will also complete a craft project relating to the different stops.

Tryon’s Tots and Tryon’s Explorers are designed for individual families and space is limited to 20 children for each program. Extra openings will be filled the day of the event on a first come, first served basis. If you are a preschool teacher or home school group interested in bringing a group for a program, please contact our Groups Services Coordinator at 252-639-3524 for more information. 

By Admin on Thursday, April 16, 2015 3:37 PM

GREENVILLE -- From weapon firings to sifting for gold, visitors of all ages will enjoy great explorations at the Queen Anne's RevengeConservation lab in Greenville during the April 25 N.C. Science Festival program, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Blackbeard's flagship, Queen Anne's Revenge,ran aground in June 1718 near Beaufort. Conservators and archaeologists use chemistry, geology, x-rays and more to identify and understand artifacts recovered from the wreck since 1997.T

The free, family friendly event will allow viewing tiny objects through a microscope, mixing up solutions, touching a cannon from the shipwreck, and sifting through sand to find pirate treasure! There will be live firings of muskets, pistols and small cannons at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Other replica weapons also will be displayed.

These hands-on demonstrations will show how interdisciplinary, scientific research brings North Carolina history and science to life.

By Admin on Wednesday, April 15, 2015 1:32 PM

Noon Concert May 1 to Feature World Premiere Orchestration of Greenstein’s Change

RALEIGH -- Music Director Grant Llewellyn and the North Carolina Symphony will perform Aaron Copland’s magnificent Appalachian Spring on Friday, May 1, at noon, in Meymandi Concert Hall in downtown Raleigh as the season finale of its popular Friday Favorites series. The concert will also feature a World Premiere Orchestration of the Judd Greenstein composition Change, and Barber’s Adagio for Strings and Essay No. 2.

North Carolina Symphony Scholar-in-Residence William Robin says of Appalachian Spring, “It describes a spring celebration of American pioneers with the hopeful anticipation of a marriage, a powerful sermon from a revivalist pastor and a couple settling into their new lives…. Copland is the quintessentially unadorned composer, and Appalachian Spring the quintessentially unadorned work.”

Barber’s Adagio was well-loved by Copland, according to Robin.  “‘It’s really well felt, it’s believable you see, it’s not phony,’ Copland wrote about Samuel Barber’s Adagio for Strings. ‘It comes straight from the heart.’ Given the ubiquity, indeed the inescapability, of Barber’sAdagio — from the funerals of presidents to Platoon to innumerable parodies of Platoon — it’s refreshing to know that the plainspoken Copland held it in high regard. Inspired by Virgil, Barber composed the work as the middle movement of a string quartet in 1936 and expanded its orchestration two years later.  Like Appalachian Spring, Barber’s Second Essay has wartime implications… Completed in March 1942, the Essay seems to teem with the sounds of World War II.”

By Admin on Wednesday, April 15, 2015 12:22 PM

April 23 Concert in Chapel Hill, April 24-25 Concerts in Raleigh Feature Soprano Shara Worden, World Premiere Orchestration of Greenstein Work “Change”

RALEIGH -- Music Director Grant Llewellyn and the North Carolina Symphony will perform Aaron Copland’s magnificent Appalachian Spring on Thursday, April 23, at 7:30 p.m., in Memorial Hall on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and again on Friday and Saturday, April 24-25, at 8 p.m., in Meymandi Concert Hall in downtown Raleigh.

The concerts will also feature a World Premiere Orchestration of Judd Greenstein’s “Change,” Barber’s Adagio for Strings and Essay No. 2, and Sarah Kirkland Snider’s Three Songs from Unremembered, featuring soprano Shara Worden.

North Carolina Symphony Scholar-in-Residence William Robin says of Appalachian Spring, “It describes a spring celebration of American pioneers with the hopeful anticipation of a marriage, a powerful sermon from a revivalist pastor and a couple settling into their new lives…. Copland is the quintessentially unadorned composer, and Appalachian Spring the quintessentially unadorned work.”

By Admin on Tuesday, April 14, 2015 12:26 PM

RALEIGH -- Pokémon: Symphonic Evolutions, a special concert event with the North Carolina Symphony, will fill Meymandi Concert with the sights and sounds of recent and classic Pokémon video games on Friday, May 29, at 7:30 p.m.  Tickets for the one-concert only performance go on sale Monday, April 20 at 10 a.m. at www.ncsymphony.org.

The Pokémon Company International and Princeton Entertainment announced today 30 new dates and locations for the official Pokémon live orchestral concert, Pokémon: Symphonic Evolutions. After sold out performances in Washington, D.C. and Pittsburgh, PA and selling 5,000 tickets in Philadelphia, fans across the country will soon get the opportunity to see and hear Pokémon: Symphonic Evolutions in a city near them. More information about the new dates, locations, and how to purchase tickets can be found at Pokemon.com/symphony.

By Admin on Monday, April 13, 2015 3:54 PM

RALEIGH -- Union Gen. William T. Sherman and Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston negotiated the largest troop surrender of the Civil War on April 26, 1865, effectively ending the Civil War. Re-enactment of those negotiations at Bennett Place State Historic Site, and other developments from the Civil War including a "Soldier Walk Home" and "Hotel de 'Afrique" lecture, will be presented through June at venues of the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

By Admin on Monday, April 13, 2015 12:56 PM

RALEIGH -- While the Uwharrie Mountains date back millions of years to the time of active volcanoes in North Carolina, geologists and archaeologists are focusing on just 10,000 years ago for the 2015 Lithics Conference April 25 in Raleigh. Experts from across the state will convene to review what the study of rocks and stone artifacts tell us about early man. The public is invited.

The "Modeling Prehistoric Behavior Through Lithic Studies: A North Carolina Example" conference will examine research in Stanly and Montgomery Counties in the Uwharrie National Forest area and other parts of North Carolina. Review of artifacts from Town Creek Indian Mound in Montgomery County will allow discussion of possible avenues for future analysis of existing data from one of the most well studied archaeological sites in the state.

The Oshnock Collection was recently donated to the N.C. Office of State Archaeology. It is a well- documented collection containing many Paleo-Indian artifacts from Wake, Harnett and Franklin counties. Brothers Jim and Bob Oshnock maintained this valuable collection for many years. A portion of the collection will be on display at the conference.

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