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Thursday, April 24, 2014

Tsars


The Tsars’ Cabinet: Two Hundred Years of Russian Decorative Arts Under the Romanovs and Windows into Heaven: Russian Icons from the Lilly and Francis Robicsek Collection of Religious Art

Friday, Oct. 4, 2013, through Wednesday, March 5, 2014

The year 2013 marks the 400th anniversary of the beginning of the Romanov Dynasty, or the House of Romanov — the imperial monarchy that ruled Russia from 1613 until 1917 and included the reigns of Peter the Great, Catherine the Great and Nicholas II, the last tsar. To commemorate the event, the N.C. Museum of History is hosting two magnificent exhibitions that will run concurrently. 


The Tsars’ Cabinet
showcases more than 230 porcelain and decorative arts objects that exemplify the craftsmanship of artisans under the Romanov tsars. Many of the pieces were made for the ruling tsars and their families. See objects produced by the Imperial Porcelain Factory in St. Petersburg, one of the oldest porcelain factories in Europe, as well as wares made by the Imperial Glass Factory in St. Petersburg and examples of intricate enamel work from renowned firms such as Fabergé and Ovchinnikov.

From the life of sumptuous excess under the tsars, Windows into Heaven plumbs the mystical depth of the Russian spirit and offers a glimpse into eternity via the dignified grandeur of the Russian Orthodox Church. Christianity officially came to Russia from Byzantium (Constantinople) in 988, and Russian churches adopted the ancient tradition of Byzantine icon painting. The exhibition brings together 36 Russian icons dating from the 18th and 19th centuries on loan from the private collection of Lilly and Francis Robicsek of Charlotte, N.C.

The Tsars’ Cabinet
is organized by The Muscarelle Museum of Art at the College of William & Mary from the Kathleen Durdin Collection, in collaboration with International Arts & Artists. Major sponsors of the exhibitions include North Carolina News Network, Duke Progress Energy, News & Observer, Ragland Family Foundation, and Mr. and Mrs. Everette C. Sherrill. 


See both exhibitions for one admission price.
Tickets cost $7 for ages 12 and up; $5 for children ages 7 to 11, senior citizens, active military personnel, college students with ID, and groups of 10 or more (per person). Admission is free for children ages 6 and under and for Museum Associates members. Beginning Sept. 20, purchase tickets online at www.ncmuseumofhistory.org or in the Museum Shop.


For more information about the Museum of History, call 919-807-7900 or access ncmuseumofhistory.org or Facebook. To schedule tours for groups of 10 or more, sign up online at nccapvisit.org.

Vladimir Mother of God Icon, egg tempera and gilt on wood, Russian, 19th c. Photo courtesy of Mason Sklut. Windows Into Heaven brings together Russian Orthodox icons dating from the 18th and 19th centuries.
Vladimir Mother of God Icon, egg tempera and gilt on wood, Russian, 19th c. Photo courtesy of Mason Sklut. Windows into Heaven brings together Russian Orthodox icons dating from the 18th and 19th centuries.

Campana Urn Illustrating the Arts, hard-paste porcelain, Imperial Porcelain Factory, Russia, c. 1845. Photo credit: Giovanni Lunardi. More than 200 porcelain and decorative arts objects are featured in The Tsars’ Cabinet.
Campana Urn Illustrating the Arts, hard-paste porcelain, Imperial Porcelain Factory, Russian, c. 1845. Photo courtesy of Giovanni Lunardi. More than 230 porcelain and decorative arts objects are featured in The Tsars’ Cabinet.