NC Oyster Week

 

Join us October 11 - 15, 2021 as we virtually "shellebrate" the history, culture, economy, and ecology of oysters in North Carolina!

Oysters play an important role in coastal communities. In the environment, oysters filter water, improving water quality, and create habitat for other animals. Their unique flavor makes them a desirable dish, supporting the livelihoods of watermen and local economies across the state. The N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, NC Oyster TrailNorth Carolina Sea Grant, and the NC Coastal Federation have partnered to bring you five days of oyster facts, resources, and programming. 

We will be sharing on social media using the hashtags #NCOysterWeek #NCOysters #GiveAShuck.

Full list of events

Oct. 11 - On the Farm

Oct. 11 - On the Farm

Learn more about Oyster farming in North Carolina! Oysters play a unique role in purifying waterways and contributing to biodiversity. Oyster farming is a sustainable farming method that has seen tremendous growth in North Carolina over the past five years.
 

Oct. 12 - At the Coast

Oct. 12 - At the Coast

Our native eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is one of the most important species in our estuaries. Oysters benefit North Carolina’s coastal ecology and economy. These benefits can be summarized and referred to as the three “Fs”, for short: food, filter and fish habitat. They filter water, provide food for humans and create reefs that build homes for more fish. These environmental benefits, in turn, support jobs and provide economic opportunities for coastal communities.

Oct. 13 - In the Kitchen

Oct. 13 - In the Kitchen

Oysters have been part of our diet for hundreds of years! 

In the late 1880s, oysters from North Carolina were being harvested at unprecedented rates and shipped by boxcar to San Francisco and New York.

According to available data, the harvest peak occurred in 1902 with 800,000 bushels of oysters–5.6 million pounds of oyster meat–harvested from N.C. waters. Oysters were viewed as a delicacy by some, and as an aphrodisiac by others contributing to their intense popularity. Since the harvest peak, North Carolina’s oyster harvests declined a low of 35,000 bushels in 1994.  2017 harvest was approximately 158,000 bushels.

Oct. 14 - In the Classroom

Oct. 14 - In the Classroom

Learn more about oyster educational resources and curriculum. 

Oct. 15 - From Oyster to Art

Oct. 15 - From Oyster to Art

Oysters aren't just for eating! Artists are exploring new and creative ways to create art from oysters.