Inaugural Parade Showcases the Diversity of Cultural Resources Programs

2013 Inaugural Parade - Cultural Resources 21 Nearly 120 employees and volunteers from across the state represented Cultural Resources at the governor’s inaugural parade Saturday. The group reflected some of the wonderful informational and educational opportunities from the department to offer great family fun:

  • Costumed interpreters reflecting the styles worn by North Carolinians from the colonial period through the early 20th century and representing the work of all Cultural Resources museums and historic sites to share the sights and sounds of our state’s history with visitors
  • An interpreter representing Harriet Jacobs, a slave who hid in her grandmother’s attic in what is today Historic Edenton for seven years before escaping to freedom
  • Interpreters portraying pirates who represent the Office of State Archaeology’s research on the Queen Anne’s Revenge and the artifacts on display at the Maritime Museum in Beaufort
  • Volunteers from the Old Hickory Division of World War I, as portrayed by interpreters, representing the department’s upcoming centennial observance of “the war to end all wars”
  • A 1929 Fire Truck and 1936 Highway Patrol from the North Carolina Transportation Museum in Spencer

A colonial era fife and drum corps representing Tryon Palace in New Bern, along with ante bellum era Jonnkonu performers capturing a Christmas time performance tradition of the enslaved French and Indian War era interpreters representing the frontier outpost of Fort Dobbs in Statesville Elizabethan interpreters representing Roanoke Island Festival Park and the 1585 settlement of the Lost Colony in Manteo Pre-colonial era fighters against Colonial Governor Tryon from Alamance Battleground in Burlington Cultural Resources annually serves more than 19 million people through its 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, the nation’s first state-supported  Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the N.C. Arts Council and the State Archives.

The department also champions North Carolina’s creative industry, which employs nearly 300,000 North Carolinians and contributes more than $41 billion to the state’s economy.

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