6 Artifacts from Our Collections Related to Martin Luther King, Jr.

As we pause today to remember the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the civil rights movement he helped lead, we wanted to highight a few items from our collections that showcase some of the connections King had a to Tar Heel State.

1.  A color comic book that tells the story of King and his work in Montgomery, Ala., now part of the N.C. Museum of History’s collection

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2. A 1962 telegram from King to then Gov. Terry Sanford requesting help in getting prisoners in Edenton released, now part of the State Archives’ collection

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3. A photo of King giving a speech at N.C. Central University in Durham in 1966, now part of the State Archives’ collection

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4. A button advertising King’s July 1966 speech at Reynolds Coliseum in Raleigh, now part of the N.C. Museum of History’s collection

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5. A photo of King at a rally in Durham in 1958, now part of the State Archives’ collection

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6. A 1962 memo from a senior member of the State Highway Patrol to Terry Sanford detailing King’s recent visit to North Carolina and the police protection he received, now in the collection of the State Archives

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Other resources related to King and North Carolina’s rich civil rights heritage that are worth checking out include:

1.  The story of King “rehearsing” his “I Have A Dream” speech at a Rocky Mount church and other civil rights-related posts on our This Day in N.C. History blog

2. A Change is Gonna Come, an online exhibit on civil rights from the N.C. Museum of History

3. The Virtual MLK Project from N.C. State University

Check out the North Carolina Digital Collections and our online collections databaseto discover more primary materials from North Carolina’s past.

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